The Formability of sheet metals Previous posts Materials Matters- “The known unknowns”  and “Material plasticity visualized” covered the general aspects, common terminology, and formulation of the plastic properties in sheet metal forming problems. Accurate definition of flow curves, kinematic hardening…

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For the continued growth of tube-hydroforming, better methods for creating and validating springback compensation are essential. Upcoming vehicle programs forecast increasing use of Advanced High-Strength Steel along with more tube-hydroformed parts.  The release of AutoForm-HydroDesigner2016 represents the first commercial solution…

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Lately, one of the most frequently asked questions in metal forming simulation has been “Can your software model the effects of a servo press?” The answer to this question has been YES and NO. It’s YES because, with most metal…

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In our previous post on the stamping system, several environmental variables within production sheet metal stamping are mentioned. In that post we listed variables such as blank surface, blank coating, tool surface, tool coating, and blank/die lubrication. These variables are…

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As already discussed in Sheet metal plasticity visualized (part one) there are four main components needed to model the plastic deformation of sheet metals: yield function, hardening model, flow rule, and failure model. We have expanded our discussion of the…

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The blank is one of the first parameters defined in a stamping simulation; it’s mechanical properties, shape, and location in the tool. However, many engineers underestimate the impact that the assumed blank shape and location will have on the final…

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We are pleased that the SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) Stamping and Dies Technical Group and Metal Forming Simulation Technical Group will host a webinar on May 11th where AutoForm-ProcessEngineering along with Triboform will be discussed. Knowing which friction value is…

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As already discussed in the post “Constitutive modeling of sheet metal” there are four main components needed to model the plastic deformation of sheet metals: yield function, hardening model, flow rule, and failure model. These concepts have theoretical backgrounds based…

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Springback of sheet metal stamped parts is a challenge faced by tooling suppliers and their customers; parts produced in stamping dies require significant effort in engineering and simulation to arrive at reasonable dimensional accuracy during process design. Conventional methods for…

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Modeling of sheet metal stamping can raise many questions regarding the validity of engineering decisions based on finite element analysis. Knowing only the grade and thickness of the material modeled can still leave some open questions regarding the “known” parameters…

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